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Readers' PDF Gallery

About the Readers' PDF Gallery

We know that lots of you are producing PDF publications of your work, but need a way to get them in front of an audience. In the Readers' PDF Gallery, we can do just that! Send in your finished PDF for review and we'll publish the best of them in this new gallery. It's a great way for you to connect with a wider audience for your work.

Why PDFs?

I don't think I know a photographer who would turn down the opportunity to have their work published in a book — especially if the publisher is footing the bill for design, printing, publication, and publicity. On our own, however, taking funds out of the household budget for a book publishing project is a bit of a challenge. PDFs provide an ideal alternative!

How About Your Work?

Do you have work you'd like us to consider for the Readers' PDF Gallery? If so, you'll want to review our submissions information in the You and Your Work section of this website. We are always looking for good photography to share with our readers, but obvioiusly can't publish what we never have a chance to review! We are constantly looking for work for LensWork, LensWork Extended, and these new LensWork Online galleries. Perhaps there's a slot for your work!

Download instructions

There are two ways to view a PDF. You can just click on it, or you can "download" it. There is a big difference.

If you click, the PDF will probably open inside your browser window. (Virtually all browsers have the ability to open a PDF in a browser window.) By doing so, you will start what is called a "helper app" instance of your PDF reader that will render the document inside the browser. That's okay, but you might be missing some of the full impact of a full screen presentation and worse, you might not have all the features of our PDFs available to you.

It is better to actually download the PDF to your local computer, then open it with the Adobe Reader as a free-standing application. This will ensure you will see the document as we intended, with all the features enabled and all the impact of a full screen presentation. As an added benefit, you will also have the entire content of the document on your local hard drive and won't need access to the Internet to view it next time. This also allows you to build your own personal library of favorite PDFs!

To download, right-click (Ctrl click on a mac) on the PDF link and choose "Save as . . ." from the list of options. Navigate to the location where you want to store the file and save it there. Open the PDF from your storage location.

Firefox users will find the PDF Download plug-in by Nitro PDF Software a valuable aid for downloading PDFs in their entirety.


Castle of Power
by Jacek Stefanski

At first glance, the electric power plant’s building resembles a stronghold set on water. Its construction, being a function of technology and resulting from technical requirements, yet, at the same time, it is also graceful. We can notice that the designers were people with a sense of aesthetics with no fear of non-standard solutions, combining interesting asymmetry with harmony. It is deeply beautiful, a structure rooted in its practical functioning.

 

www.jacekstefanskiart.com


ESP
by Victor Filepp

In March 2015 a trip to Philadelphia, PA, USA took us to Eastern State Penitentiary. ESP was once the most famous and expensive prison in the world, but stands today in ruin, a haunting world of crumbling cellblocks and empty guard towers. Originally inspired by humanistic principles of the Enlightenment period. It was to be a true penitentiary, a prison designed to create genuine regret and penitence in the criminal's heart.

 

www.vivafigi.com


People of Morocco
by Daniel Kehlenbach

 

 

dankehlenbach.zenfolio.com


A New Mexico Portfolio
by John Custodio

New Mexico is a land of contrasts – from ancient civilizations to the development of the atomic bomb. It’s also a land of spectacular landscapes, rich in Spanish and Native American cultures. This PDF features a selection of photographs I made on several trips to New Mexico. They span a timeline stretching from the formation of river gorges and sand dunes millions of years ago, to churches built during the Spanish Colonial period, to examples of architecture in the heyday of railroad travel and at the beginning of the automobile era.

 

www.JohnCustodio.com


2015: A Selection of Photographs
by Stuart Williams

My aim is to keep my eyes (and soul!) open to photographic opportunities as I travel through the astonishing places on earth that I am lucky enough to visit. From time to time, I am presented with a moment (and composition that tickles some part of me) into which all the right ingredients (form, texture and light) are generously poured, and I have time to set up the camera, compose and trip the shutter. I then look forward to the process of developing the films (sometimes several months later), and the elation is relived when I pull the wet film from a reel and I see that the negative promises everything I envisaged at the time.

 

stuart@xanthophloea.net


Traces of a Metal Milling Machine
by Hardy-Bernd Wagner

One day I visited my nephew who is the owner of a metal processing company. Most metal work there is done by CNC milling machines. I went through the factory hall and saw masses of milling spans which caught my attention, because they had interesting forms and were glittering. At that time I worked a lot with bokehs of flairs and this spans promised to produce wonderful flairs. And they did. Then I detected the traces of the milling machine on metal surfaces, and it showed wonderful textures and structures. By using a macro lens, different light, and filters, wonderful structures and spatial impressions appeared.

 

http://hwhw.de


To Know a Place: The Greensprings Nature Trail
by Dan Kehlenbach

While there are no mountains along the Greensprings Nature Trail, I learned many valuable lessons about nature and quite a bit about myself during my regular walks along the trail.

 

dankehlenbach.zenfolio.com


Wisconsin Native American Rock Art: Gullickson's Glen
by Daniel M. Seurer

"Gullickson's Glen is a State of Wisconsin Natural Area located near Black River Falls Wisconsin. The ancient rock art is found on the back and flanking sides of a small rockshelter in the driftless area of western Wisconsin."

 

danseurer.com


Along Two Rivers: The Colonial Parkway
by Dan Kehlenbach

"Linking Virginia's historical towns of Yorktown, Williamsburg, and Jamestown is the 23 mile Colonial Parkway. A designated National Scenic Byway and All-American Road, the Parkway provides dramatic vistas of the James and York Rivers as well as shady passageways through pine hardwood forests."

 

dankehlenbach.zenfolio.com


wood nymph folio case
by Dennis Humphrey

Editor's Note: After going through the Folios Visual Workshop, Dennis Humphrey created this lovely presentation for his project.

"wood nymph is about an artist and a wood nymph. It evokes struggle, transformation and rebirth through a deep longing for change, tempered by a strong determination to preserve an existing order. It illustrates a bond between nature and human.

"The folio book set comprises handmade components that engage the reader in quietly discovering the spirit of the woodland through sight and touch.

"All components are enclosed in a 5" x 5" x 1" paper case with four folding flaps and a sliding belly band."

 

dennishumphrey.wix.com/artphoto


A Land Made of Rain
by Daniel Kehlenbach

"Alaska's southeast corner harbors the largest contiguous expanse of temperate rainforest on earth, much of it within the majestic, mysterious Tongass National Forest. Nuzzling Glacier Bay, the forests of the Tongass lie on a maze of islands and along a coastline protected by granite mountains. These mountains hold moisture along the coast, which combines with the geology to form a land of huge trees and a habitat for some of the most abundant wildlife left in the Country."

- The Book of the Tongass

 

dankehlenbach.zenfolio.com


Ice Storm
by William Hertha

On December 22nd 2013 we awoke to the sound of crackling wood. It was from the trees in front of our house breaking under the weight of the ice that had accumulated over the night...

 

www.hertha.com


Rhyolite, Nevada
by Ian Barber

Rhyolite is a ghost town in Nye County, in the U.S. state of Nevada. It is in the Bullfrog Hills, about 120 miles northwest of Las Vegas, near the eastern edge of Death Valley.

Rhyolite declined almost as rapidly as it rose. After the richest ore was exhausted, production fell. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the financial panic of 1907 made it more difficult to raise development capital. In 1908, investors in the Montgomery Shoshone Mine, concerned that it was overvalued, ordered an independent study.

 

www.ianbarberphotography.co.uk


2014: A Selection of Photographs
by Stuart Williams

Without exception, these images arc made in places that are far from any beaten track and some of the places are visited exceedingly rarely. As such, I hope that they offer you an enjoyable glimpse of the beauty of these places, albeit through my camera's lens and my interpretation.

 

stuart@xanthophloea.net


Imphal
by Farhiz Karanjawala

Much of the countryside outside Imphal remains unchanged seventy years after the war ended. In the southeast, on the Tamu-Palel road, though Nature has repossessed the hills of the Shenam Saddle — Scraggy, Gibraltar, Recce Hill and all the others are thick with trees and undergrowth once again — the slit trenches dug by the soldiers are still there. In Sangshak, in the northeast spoke, the village has a new church but the football field is the same. The sun still beats down fiercely on the paddy fields, the rice stalks dry and dusty before the rains, as they were at the Battle of Nungshigum in the Iril River valley. And the turel still runs through Ningthukhong on the Tiddim Road.

 

farhiz@gmail.com


Wicks Forge
by Karla Bernstein

Nicholas Wicks Moreau is the 26-year-old founder of Wicks Forge and its sole blacksmith artist. He is one of three generations of metal workers within the Wicks family. William P. Wicks, Nick’s great- grandfather, was a pioneer in the metal and welding business in the early 1900’s. He founded Wicks Welding and then Wicks Products in New York City. Additionally, William ran a welding school, training both male and female welders for the US efforts in WWII. William’s son Edward, Nick’s grandfather, attended this program and continued on in the welding business. Eventually Edward retired, storing many of the welding tools in his garage in Danbury, CT. As time went on the tools became intermixed with many other artifacts of the Wicks family’s life.

 

karlabernsteinphotography.zenfolio.com


Lines in the Light
by Rudi Neumaier

The photographs in this portfolio were made in a couple of hours on a Saturday afternoon in 2013.

 

www.rneumaier.ch


2013: A Selection of Photographs
by Stuart Williams

I have organized the selection of images this year into chronological order and the legend to each image tells of the place and country in which it was made. As a result, this year’s selection is even more a visual travelogue than previous years. As ever, the selection of the set of images that follows was somewhat of a whimsical process.

 

stuart@xanthophloea.net


Lincoln Cathedral
by Ian Barber

Lincoln Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Diocese, the parish church of the County, a place of national heritage and a centre of international pilgrimage.

 

www.ianbarberphotography.co.uk


Gjomlevatnet
by Ronny A. Nilsen

Not many people would know where this small body of water is located, beside the locals. All the letters in the name aren’t even on your computer's keyboard outside of Norway. But combine this small unknown body of water, with a cold winter day, some snow, fog and a sun that never climbs high in the sky during the winter. The result is something that belongs in a fairytale, with a soft light and a stillness that instills one with a sense of magic.

 

www.ronnynilsen.com


The Yucca: 37 Minutes, 24 Seconds
by Ronny A. Nilsen

 

 

www.ronnynilsen.com


MotorCycle Abstracts
by John Miller

The Lone Star Rally descends upon Galveston Island each Fall, bringing upward of 500,000 visitors to the quaint little island over the course of a weekend. All sorts of bikers and non bikers are in attendance and it makes for quite an event. There are hundreds of vendors displaying and selling just about everything associated with biker culture.

 

www.johnmillerphoto.com


Pontem Nostris (Our Bridge)
by John Miller

Pontem Nostris (our bridge) is a photographic study of the Galveston Causeway bridge. This initial series of photographs concentrates on the underlying structure. A whole other world exists above the support structure and will be the focus of a future series of images.

 

www.johnmillerphoto.com


Intimate Images of Sandstone: Small-Scale Landscapes of the Ocean Bluff
by Frank Field

This eFolio explores the sandstone ocean bluffs of Northern California, specifically those at The Sea Ranch on the coast of Sonoma County. I continue to be attracted to these bluffs. The texture is almost always gritty and the patterns of layered, fractured and eroding sandstone provide graphic shapes that I enjoy capturing with my camera. I hope that you come away from this eFolio with a strong sense of these bluffs.

 

www.edgelightimages.com


Godaland
by Leighton Clancy

A chance encounter with a misplaced book simply entitled "Iceland" with photographs by Patrick Desgraupes was my first exposure to the remarkable landscape of this country. In 2009, some years later, I travelled to Iceland with my partner. Liberated from the burden of the everyday, as one is when more than 16,000km from home, this trip proved to be a transformative experience. A gentle reminder to slow down, look, listen and feel. However, few if any of the original colour images captured the immensity of the landscape or mood imparted by the often fickle weather. Two years later we returned to traverse the network of trails in the highland regions of Landmannalaugar, Kerlingarfjöll and Godaland.

 

leighton.clancy@gmail.com


Passing Through
by Bruce Pollock

Generally, I have been a traveler with a camera, rather than a photographer in a distant location. This portfolio is a collection of those small confluences, rather than an in-depth view of a specific destination. Each image is accompanied by some descriptive commentary about the situation at the time of exposure. Together, they suggest an impression of places I have visited.

 

www3.telus.net/pollock/bruce


Stone Comfort
by Edd Fuller

A visual essay on the historic Cedar Hill Cemetery in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Cedar Hill is one of the oldest continuously operating cemeteries in the country, dating from the early 1800s. The photos were taken in April, 2013.

 


Into the Silent Land: Landscapes of the Canadian Rockies
by Steve Parker

Since making that decision all those years ago, I have been fortunate enough to travel about and see some wonderful places. Canada, and in particular the Rockies, was always one of those countries that I wanted to visit but somehow never got around to. I had long been taken with the breathtaking images I had seen taken by my contemporaries but never really thought that I'd ever make it out there. However, back in December 2012 – thanks to a late deal package holiday and a wife with a ferocious tenacity to find an online deal – I did get to make ¡t out there.

 

www.steveparkerphotography.com


Macy's Fireworks Display
New York City, July 4th, 2013

by John Custodio

 

www.johncustodio.com


Custodio

A California Portfolio
by John Custodio

California’s diverse geography ranges from the Pacific Coast in the west, the Sierra Nevada mountains in the east, the Redwood and Douglas fir forests in the northwest, and the Mojave Desert in the southeast. The center of the state is dominated by the Central Valley, a major agricultural area. It is one of my favorite places for landscape photography.

 

www.johncustodio.com


Parker

Around The House
by Steve Parker

I don't know if it's a lack of discipline or motivation but I've never been one for project per se preferring to photograph whatever takes my eye.
I kept vowing that one day I would set myself a project, follow through and complete it but somehow never made it.

However, not so long ago I had purchased a new compact camera that let me play around with the aspect seetings in camera and with a penchant for the square format, I flicked the camera into 1:1 mode and set myself a goal of photographing as many household objects as I could within 5 minutes flat. It just seemed like as good way as any to test the camera out and get a feel for it.

As I moved through the ground floor looking at things in a square format I began to notice compositional opportunities that had never occurred to me before and so I went about my business conscious of the self-imposed time pressure. When I'd finished I had some 60 images that, for some reason, left me quite satisfied. I felt like I'd seen my home in quite a different way.

 

www.steveparkerphotography.com


Custodio

Las Vegas in Infrared
by John Custodio

This is the first project I photographed with an infrared modified digital camera. I had been to Las Vegas many times over the years, but primarily because that's where the plane lands. Las Vegas has the closest airport to southern Utah and western Arizona, places I've gone to many times to do landscape photography. Also, flights to Las Vegas from New York are relatively cheap. However, I never was really interested in Las Vegas as a photographic subject — "too colorful" in color, not that interesting in black-and-white. But on one trip out west, I decided to take some shots on my newly modified camera. The fantasy effect that the infrared portion of the spectrum adds to the already fantastical architecture really inspired me to pursue this further and to complete the project over several trips.

 

www.johncustodio.com


Lee

Windows & Walls
by Terry D. Lee

There are times over the course of one's artistic endeavours that you inevitably find yourself drawn to a particular subject, style, or rhythm. Picasso had his blue period. Ansel had Yosemite. I have noticed that over the past eight years a lot of my photographic work has been focused (pun intended) on windows and walls. Thus, I decided to create this folio based on this theme, or as I prefer to think of it, this vein of my artistic being.

 

www.tleephotography.com


Custodio

The Columbia Canal and Guignard Brick Kilns
by John Custodio

Using an infrared modified digital camera, I photographed two examples of old industrial sites in the Columbia, South Carolina area. I spent a foggy December morning at the Columbia Canal and then a few days later wandered a bit down river to the site of an abandoned brickworks complex. Recording these scenes in infrared added an interesting dimension to these historic places.

 

www.johncustodio.com


Stuart

2012: A Selection of Photographs
by Stuart Williams

As with two thousand and eleven, the selection of this year's images reflects the continued transition into a new country – Uganda – and some of the travels I made in the past twelve months. This means that almost all the images are made opportunistically during the travels which included visits to some new – but also some familiar – places.

 

stuartdwilliams@gmail.com


Dan Chung

Dan Chung Photography

These are the things that I think are beautiful while I walk around in the woods. They are glimpses of fleeting compositions that catches the corner of my eye.

To me, the location of where the pictures were taken is not important, because my interest is not the location itself, but how the branches lay on the ground, or how the light filters through the leaves.

 

www.danchungphoto.com


Ekin

Olive Trees of Ayvalik
by A. Cemal Ekin

In my repeated visits to Ayvalik I admired and photographed olive trees, and learned that they live extremely long lives, centuries, even millennia. The damage that may come to the tree trunk and branches may be repaired in time from its robust root structure. A well-kept olive tree presents itself with grace and power. For reasons I do not know, most olive trees seem to grow with a clockwise rotational movement. It may be due to its effert to chase the sun, or maybe even to have a larger surface to absorb moisture. This twisting growth visible on most olive tree trunks as twisting lines. Some even manifest a pair or even a trio of trunks growing with a similar movement.These lines give the olive trees a unique appearance and a strong character to study.

 

www.keptlight.com


Custodio

A South Carolina Portfolio
by John Custodio

South Carolina can be a land of mystery and history if you look hard enough. Swamps, marshes, coastal areas shrouded in fog, old buildings fallen to ruins long ago, are some of the subjects I found in my travels through the South Carolina Low Country. These photographs are part of a continuing series that I started several years ago on periodic trips "down south" (I live in New York City.)

 

www.johncustodio.com


Leuba

Welle's Garage
by John Leuba

Peter's machine shop catapults you back in time. All the machines in the shop were manufactured in New England between 1865 and 1910. All are belt driven through a maze of belts in the ceiling just as they were originally installed. Only the driving power has changed. An electric motor powers them now. "It's actually safer this way," Peter responded when I asked about belt breakage. "Unlike a modern machine, these work at low rpms. So when something does break there's much less torque to deal with."

 

www.leubaphoto.com


Custodio

A Hawai'i Portfolio
by John Custodio

This PDF features a selection of black and white photographs I made on two trips to the Hawaiian Islands in November 2010 and then again in May 2011. The first was to The Big Is land where I circled the island on the Hawai’i Belt Road, photographing in rain forests, on the coast, in cemeteries, and in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The Big Island was the most recently formed of all the Hawaiian Islands and is thus the most volcanic and rocky, with lava fields everywhere.

 

www.JohnCustodio.com


Leuba

Barn Island
by John Leuba

The photographs in this PDF were made over the course of the past two years at Barn Island, a natural preserve located in Stonington, Connecticut. It is a former farm with many stone walls and fields which are now being overtaken by the grasses, vines, and trees of the surrounding woods. I do not feel that Barn Island is a majestic place. It does not have the soaring mountains or endless dunes, but is a beautiful place with marshes and trees typical of the New England coast.

 

www.leubaphoto.com


Kirlangic

Kirlangiç: A Photographic Study
by A. Cemal Ekin

Left unkempt, devoid of basic maintenance, a lack of general respect for preservation can turn a structure into a crumbling ruin in short order. I became acutely aware how quickly solid structures could decay when I visited a couple of sites in Ayvalik. I am grateful for receiving the permission from the mayor’s office to wander around the old Kirlangiç olive oil factory, explore, and photograph one of the iconic structures in Ayvalik.

 

www.keptlight.com

Google+ gplus.to/ACEkin


On the Hills of Mount Ida

On the Hills of Mount Ida
by A. Cemal Ekin

Among the short trips I took while in Turkey this year was a ride from Ayvalik to Kalkim, a small town on the northern side of Mount Ida. The Journey turned out to be more interesting than the destination as the small town did not offer anything special.

Along the way, we stopped often to photograph the environs. Around the region, the lowlands flora is dominated by olive trees and the highlands, pine. This collection of photographs feature mainly pine trees at different locations, along with several plane trees at one location.

 

www.keptlight.com

Google+ gplus.to/ACEkin


Providence College Infrared

Providence College: Infrared
by A. Cemal Ekin

The colors of Providence College, black and white, are reflected in this small photogaphic study. All the photographs are taken with an infrared sensitive camera and the false colors were converted to B&W.

 

www.keptlight.com

Google+ gplus.to/ACEkin


Hopgood

Sossusvlei
by Mark Hopgood

I have always found deserts to be the most fascinating and beautful of landscapes. The starkness of the landscape allows one to slow down and evokes a more contemplative mood that harmonises with the pursuit of photography.

 

romarimages.com


Tom Green

Graves of Old Mesilla
by Tom Green

The idea for this body of work was born in the White Oaks, New Mexico, graveard. White Oaks is a historic mining town of the late 1800’s. Photographing the grave marker of James W. Bell took me back in time when this deputy sheriff was murdered by “Billy the Kid” during his 1881 escape from the Lincoln County jail in Lincoln, New Mexico. Much has been written about that incident and it has been portrayed ¡n multiple movies.

 

tomgreen00@comcast.net


Stuart Williams

2011: A Selection of Photographs
by Stuart Williams

Two thousand and eleven was a year of change primarily involving a move from Mozambique to Uganda. Despite the fact that there was some reluctance to leave Mozambique (with its 2,500km of coastline, relatively traffic-free capital, and good friends) for Uganda (a land-locked country with notorious traffic issues in Kampala and where we knew few people), a restlessness pervaded the year.

 

stuartdwilliams@gmail.com


Baciu

Granny's Place
by Andrei Baciu

You simply have the sensation that Granny has just gone out for some small chat in the neighbourhood and they, the chambers, packed with old stuff, packed with light, continue to breathe at the same time with the play of the shades through the window and with the idle flight of some specks of dust that got lost in the area.

 

andreibaciu.1x.com

ierdnaclaudiu@yahoo.com


Baciu

Winterly Haiku
by Andrei Baciu

Maybe sometimes the meaning of a photogfaphy doesn't reside in transcending the one thousand words' border. Not at all, but, exactly on the contrary, a photo may well fulfill its goal by simply suggesting that, be it from time to time, moving closer to the gentle fields of silence represents a higher wisdom. Anyway, by taking and, especially making the photos below, their author began to remember. He began to remember that, in order to hear properly, what he needed first was a fruitful quietness.

 

andreibaciu.1x.com

ierdnaclaudiu@yahoo.com


Thomas

Temple Trees
by Brian Thomas

It's been said that the trees were God's first alphabet, the means by which the ancient mysteries were first whispered to man.

This mini-portfolio of Khmer temple trees begins with the ascent to Wat Phu, a 1,500 year old religious site in Laos.

 

www.pileofprints.com


Dansky

In Public: Studies from the Street
by Steven F. Dansky

In Public: Studies from the Street contains images of people I've encountered voyaging though public spaces from Fremont Street, Las Vegas, to Greenwich Village, New York. Some of the subjects in the images are known – Bill who likes to dress in black leather, Barry in a tattered mink coat purchased from a thrift shop, or Albert and his lap-dog, Princess. Others remain nameless but not unknown, because images eliminate anonymity, conveying its subjects into full disclosure.

 

www.stevendansky.com


Great Zimbabwe

One Day at Great Zimbabwe
by Stuart Williams

On 13 July 2011, I spent a day at the Great Zimbabwe ruins. This was part of a family road trip but the family were gracious enough to allow me to wander the site for the entire day. The day was not chosen for the light it offered; instead, an unpredictable series of events meant that that was the day on which we happened to visit the ruins and I had to live with the light that happened along. It was no bad thing. There was unseasonal rain in the previous days which continued on as a light drizzle in the morning of the visit. This lifted through the day and the site was flooded with warm light towards the end of the day.

 

stuartdwilliams@gmail.com


Ford

Soigné
by Dennis R. Ford

The title of this portfolio, Soigné, refers to that which is elegant, sleek and sophisticated. The selected images are of landscapes, city scenes and architecture that were gathered from my excursions throughout the United States and Europe. Each image is meant to capture in its entirety, a sense of the particular locale in a simple, yet elegant way.

 

www.dennisrford.com

dennisford@verizon.net


Sculpted Grains of Sand
by Roger Nordstrom

I have always bypassed Antelope Canyon thinking that the world had enough images from there and the world didn't need any more. But as many of us do we eventually succumb to the desire to get 'my' images of an iconic place so I went a year and a half ago. It was an experience I could not have imagined and there are few words to describe it. After feeling a little intimidated at first I spend a few days photographing both the upper and lower canyons. I wasn't done and have since returned to the canyons and will return again later this year.

 

www.rogernordstromphoto.com

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Transformations
by Joe Lipka

Before and after images of an old grade school now a new arts center in Cary, North Carolina

 

www.joelipkaphoto.com


The Call of the Ocean
by Richard Man

This portfolio, The Call of the Ocean is a part of a long term project, The Five Sacred Things, thus the complete title is Scroll One: Water - The Call of the Ocean. The Five Sacred Things in this case are Water, Earth, Air, Fire and Spirit. The former four are sacred elements, found in many cultures, that are said to make up the physical world we live in, while Spirit celebrates the life spirit of humans and other life forms, as the additional "element" that completes the world.

 

www.5pmlight.com


Something's in the Kitchen
by Joe Lipka

A home is many things and many rooms, each with a purpose. Meals are in the dining room and the best furniture is in the front room. And yet, without thinking, everyone naturally gravitates toward the kitchen.

 

www.joelipkaphoto.com